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Weight Loss Surgery is Not a Solution

The practice of combating obesity through “weight-loss surgery” (bariatric surgery) is a direct intervention to the normal function of the digestive system. A lot of people are advised by their healthcare providers that a bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment that will combat obesity.

Bariatric surgery aims to “reduce the amount people can consume at a given time and the amount of digested food they can absorb,” the New York Times reported. That’s just simply insane. Removing healthy organs is not the solution to bad food. Owning up to a weight-loss surgery is the “ultimate admission of failure.”

 

Complications

According to medical circles recommending weight-loss surgery to combat obesity, the bigger the surgery is, the higher is the percentage of Excess Weight Loss (EWL). However, they don’t tell us that the bigger the surgery is, the higher is the risk of complications.

  • About 20 percent of people who opt for weight-loss surgery require further procedures for complications.
  • As many as 30 percent of people who opt for weight-loss surgery deal with complications relating to malnutrition, like anemia or osteoporosis, since the intestines are absorbing fewer nutrients.
  • The most important complication is vitamin/protein/minerals malnutrition as a result of removing or disconnecting the organs that absorb vitamins, protein and minerals. Consequently, the patients must have lifelong supplementation.
  • Another side effect of weight-loss surgery may involve dilation of the esophagus (food pipe) if the patient overeats. This means patients need to stick to a strict diet for the rest of their lives and have regular post-operative follow-up visits.
  • Both fecal and urinary incontinence are common side effects.
  • Eating too quickly, taking big bites, not chewing enough or eating foods that are too dry can bring on nausea or vomiting in many people after weight-loss surgery. Sugary can lead to diarrhea (dumping syndrome). More than a third of patients develop gallstones, masses of cholesterol that form in the gallbladder, after surgery.
  • Some weight-loss surgery patients may develop ulcers at the site where the small intestine is connected to the pocket created from the stomach. A narrowing of the opening at this same site, may also occur, and require surgery to repair.
  • Patients are also at risk for dehydration, since the stomach can no longer hold large quantities of water.
  • Rapid weight loss can bring on feelings of fatigue, cold, mood changes and body aches, as well as cause hair thinning.
  • In rare instances, some patients may experience very low blood sugar levels combined with neurologic symptoms like confusion or even seizures, according to the Mayo Clinic, and could require pancreatic surgery to cure.
  • 20 percent of people will gain a significant amount of weight back.

 

Types of Weight-loss Surgery

If you are still convinced that the solution to bad food is to remove healthy organs, then proceed to read your weight-loss surgery options. Good luck with your choice.

There are 7 common types of weight-loss surgery. All these procedures involve the removal or disconnection of  key digestive system organs. They are nothing but surgically adapting our bodies to industrial processed harmful foods.

 

  • Gastric Sleeve 

How is it done:                

Gastric sleeve surgery (aka Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy) is performed by removing a large portion of the stomach to create a long pouch that connects the esophagus to the small intestine. The pouch is stapled and the rest of the stomach is removed.

Claimed benefits:

  1. Reduced stomach size makes the patient feel full sooner after eating.
  2. Removed portion of the stomach means fewer hunger-causing hormones are secreted, causing patient to feel less hungry generally.

 

  • Gastric Bypass  

How is it done:                

Gastric bypass (aka Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) is performed is by cutting and stapling the top portion of the stomach to create a small pouch at the end of the esophagus. The remainder of the stomach is left attached to the top of the small intestines. The small intestine is then cut and attached to the pouch. The end of the small intestine that is still connected with the non-pouch portion of the stomach is then attached to the bottom of the “Roux limb.” That way, the digestive juices produced by the stomach “meet up” with the food in the intestines.

Claimed benefits:          

  1. Reduced stomach size makes the patient feel full sooner after eating.
  2. Rearranged intestines causes the body to absorb fewer minerals.
  3. Dumping syndrome symptoms supposedly deter patients from eating un
    healthy foods. Dumping syndromeoccurs when food, especially sugar, moves from stomach into the small bowel too quickly.

 

  • Duodenal Switch  

How is it done:

Duodenal Switch (aka Biliopancreatic Diversion) starts with a gastric sleeve to reduce the stomach size, then rearranges the intestines to reduce the amount of calories the body can absorb.

A large portion of the stomach is removed to create a banana-shaped pouch connecting the esophagus to the top of the small intestine (just like a gastric sleeve). The top of the small intestine is cut. A part of the duodenum is left. The top part of the small intestine where most chemical digestion occurs is attached to the stomach. The surgeon then cuts the small intestine several feet down. The part that is still attached to the large intestine (colon) is connected to the duodenum. The loose part of the small intestine (the part that wasn’t just attached to the stomach) is then attached to the small intestine so the digestive juices it creates can mix with the food coming from the stomach.

Claimed benefits:  

  1. Reduced stomach size makes the patient feel full sooner after eating.
  2. Removed portion of the stomach means fewer hunger-causing hormones are secreted, causing patient to feel less hungry generally.
  3. Rearranged intestines causes the body to absorb fewer calories and minerals.

 

  • Lap-Band  

How is it done:                                

The Lap-Band (aka gastric band or laparoscopic adjustable gastric band) has been used in Europe since the 90’s and approved by the FDA in the States in 2001. It has since fallen out of favor in many practices due to its high long-term failure rate.

The surgery involves the sewing of a silicone and Silastic band around the top of the stomach. A balloon around the inner surface of the band (imagine the inside of a bicycle tire) is connected to a tube that leads to a port above the abdominal muscles but below the skin. During follow up visits, the doctor will add or remove saline solution (salt water) to make it tighter or looser. The tighter it is, the less hungry one feels and vice-versa.

Claimed benefits:

A band wraps around and squeezes a narrow section in the upper-middle part of the stomach. This creates a smaller stomach “section” above the band which fills up quicker after eating, causing the patient to feel full sooner and eat less.

 

  • Gastric Balloon  

How is it done:                

First, a scope is passed through mouth and into stomach. Then the scope is removed and the balloon is passed into patient’s stomach. The balloon is inflated with air or saline solution (depending on balloon type). The scope is passed into the stomach for a second time to ascertain the proper balloon position. The balloon is usually removed after 6 months.

Claimed benefits:

The inflated balloon in the stomach leaves less room for food and causes patients to feel full sooner and eat less.

 

  • vBloc Therapy  

How is it done:                

The vBloc Therapy device is implanted below the rib cage under the skin. The device is attached to the vagal nerve above the stomach via two wires.

Claimed benefits:          

Implanted vBloc Therapy device periodically blocks the vagal nerve and prevents it from delivering hunger signals to the brain, making one feel full between meals and full sooner after smaller meals.

 

  • Aspire Assist  

How is it done:                

A tube similar to a feeding tube is inserted into the stomach and attached to a port on the outside of the abdomen. A device is then attached to this port and used to drain a portion of the stomach’s contents before digestion.

Claimed benefits:          

Drain a portion of stomach contents after eating.

 

Again, removing healthy organs or interfering with the natural digestion process is not the solution to bad food. And, owning up to a weight-loss surgery is the “ultimate admission of failure.”

 

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